3D printed EDF rotor survives 20,000+ rpm




Figure 1: Side view of 3D printed EDF rotor. Reaction = 0.9, flow coefficient = 0.6, stage loading = 0.3.


I chose a compressor stage design for a 64 mm EDF based on a power consumption 600 W at 40,000 rpm. The stage has a reaction of 0.9, flow coefficient of 0.6 and a stage loading of 0.3. The rotor was 3D printed and used to replace the rotor on an existing HobbyKing 64mm EDF unit. I ran the unit up to 20,000 rpm [edit: corrected speed] without problem; the rotor survived which is good news.

Unfortunately, the rotor only drew about 110 W in a static test (no ducting). This is actually similar to the 125 W the Hobby King rotor drew. Must figure out what is going on.

Some quick ideas to investigate why the unit isn't drawing the expected power are flow slippage, lack of ducting, and rotor stall. Maybe my calcs are off, but that doesn't explain why the HobbyKing rotor draws a similar amount of power. An expert's advice may be required here.




Figure 2: 3D printed EDF rotor with Hobby King nose cone. Reaction = 0.9, flow coefficient = 0.6, stage loading = 0.3.


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